“Déjà vu Revisions”

The French term “déjà vu” literally means “already seen.”

Cezar Arro reflects on his early memories of art influenced by

antiquity, reconciling his own contemporary visions of reality

and conflating them with images that gained ground in ancient

times, at the same time evading the classical and academic

rigors of execution.

The works have a dream-like quality, not in the lyrical

sense, but of a world imagined out of a dark Gothic

imagination. For Arro, the human body in all its despairing or

exalted state, in gestures contorted by suffering, or stilled by

fear and anxiety, will always be the vessel of emotion that

cannot be equalled by the stone bodies lining up the European

cathedrals whence Gothic art first emerged in the medieval

age.

With a restless imagination prodding the artist, Arro

advances his own work which has earned him a measure of

recognition – the emergence of faces of famous celebrities in

pop culture buried under a dense tapestry of abstract gestural

forms. His revisionist works by his idol, Picasso, are by turns an

act of appropriation and a “re-visioning” of masterpieces which

he transforms into his own interpretation, itself a process of

absorption of the spirit of the Spanish master.

To be sure, Arro does not de-construct Picasso’s more

famous works, so much as re-creates them, or re-duplcates

them in the manner of a Mike Bidlo, as insinuates his own

artistic existence within the psychic confines of the fame, not to

speak of the fortune, that has engulfed such works as Femme

au Jardin (Woman in the Garden), La Reve (The Dream) and La

Femme Qui Pleure (Weeping Woman). Interestingly, these

works were inspired by Picasso’s serial mistresses, Marie

Therese Walter and Dora Maar. Of course, Picasso’s most

famous mural Guernica, which is regarded as the most

powerful and quintessential condemnation of war, undergoes a

re-working but retaining the dynamic armature of its

composition.

Arro’s revisions of masterpieces are not frontal attacks of

desecration but a tender, mirthful, and un-intimidated homage

to originals whose ultimate personal meaning for each viewer is

only as vivid and as emotional as the individual’s past and

present , a life lived as “déjà vu” – always and already seen.

-CID REYES

“Déjà vu Revisions”

The French term “déjà vu” literally means “already seen.”

Cezar Arro reflects on his early memories of art influenced by

antiquity, reconciling his own contemporary visions of reality

and conflating them with images that gained ground in ancient

times, at the same time evading the classical and academic

rigors of execution.

The works have a dream-like quality, not in the lyrical

sense, but of a world imagined out of a dark Gothic

imagination. For Arro, the human body in all its despairing or

exalted state, in gestures contorted by suffering, or stilled by

fear and anxiety, will always be the vessel of emotion that

cannot be equalled by the stone bodies lining up the European

cathedrals whence Gothic art first emerged in the medieval

age.

With a restless imagination prodding the artist, Arro

advances his own work which has earned him a measure of

recognition – the emergence of faces of famous celebrities in

pop culture buried under a dense tapestry of abstract gestural

forms. His revisionist works by his idol, Picasso, are by turns an

act of appropriation and a “re-visioning” of masterpieces which

he transforms into his own interpretation, itself a process of

absorption of the spirit of the Spanish master.

To be sure, Arro does not de-construct Picasso’s more

famous works, so much as re-creates them, or re-duplcates

them in the manner of a Mike Bidlo, as insinuates his own

artistic existence within the psychic confines of the fame, not to

speak of the fortune, that has engulfed such works as Femme

au Jardin (Woman in the Garden), La Reve (The Dream) and La

Femme Qui Pleure (Weeping Woman). Interestingly, these

works were inspired by Picasso’s serial mistresses, Marie

Therese Walter and Dora Maar. Of course, Picasso’s most

famous mural Guernica, which is regarded as the most

powerful and quintessential condemnation of war, undergoes a

re-working but retaining the dynamic armature of its

composition.

Arro’s revisions of masterpieces are not frontal attacks of

desecration but a tender, mirthful, and un-intimidated homage

to originals whose ultimate personal meaning for each viewer is

only as vivid and as emotional as the individual’s past and

present , a life lived as “déjà vu” – always and already seen.

-CID REYES